There Coccygeal, the tailbone. Each region has

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          There are two main systems that make
up our body, the Central Nervous System (CNS) and the Peripheral Nervous System
(PNS). The CNS is composed of the brain and spine. The PNS puts the brain in
touch with the physical environment, and allows it respond accordingly. The Peripheral
nerves snake from our spinal cord of the rest of our body. The spinal cord
plays a huge factor in communicating the information from the brain to the rest
of the body.

It is part of the Axial Bones, this is essentially the
foundation of your skeletal structure and what keeps your together. Your spine
is made up of 24 bones called vertebrae. Between each bone is a disc that is
known as the intervertebral disc. The bones are further connected by small
muscles called multifidi that allow you to move your spine in conjunction with
the larger muscles of your body.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

The spine is divided into five regions; the Cervical,
Thoracic, Lumbar, Sacral, and Coccygeal, the tailbone. Each region has spinal
nerves coming out the area which helps in transferring information to the rest
of the body. The Cervical spine is the neck region; this includes eight spinal
nerves. It protects the brain stem, support the skull, and allow head movements. These
nerves branch to the head, neck, shoulders, arms, and hands.

 Next is the Thoracic
vertebrae, which is the under the cervical spine and this contains twelve
spinal nerves. This is attached to the rib cage and ligaments, helps protect
vital organs and keeps them in place. These spinal nerves connect portions of
the upper abdomen and muscles in the back and chest areas.

The Lumbar spine is the third region of the spine, this
vertebra is the largest and carry most of the body’s weight. It allows more
range of motion than the thoracic spine. It enables flexion and extension
movement but actually limit our ability to rotate. The spinal nerves snake to
the lower back and legs.

The Sacrum located behind the pelvis, it fits the two hip
bone connecting the spine to the pelvis, forming a triangular shape. The spinal
nerves in this region supply to the legs, feet, genital areas of the
body. Lastly is the Coccyx, which is
also known as the tail bone, this only has one spinal nerve attaching to it.

There
is a lot going in our spinal column where millions of axons and neurotransmitters
travel up and down the spine transporting information to our brain. This
information makes our body move into different positions. There are four ways
our spine can move, flexion, hyperextension, lateral flexion and rotation. Each
region of the spine specializes in each position. For example, the Thorax
region has moderate flexion, slight hyperextension, moderate lateral flexion
and rotation. But the Lumbar region which can do all these movements can only
rotate slightly. In conclusion, the purpose
of your spine is to provide stability and keep you in an upright position which
improves your posture, enable flexibility allowing movement, protects your
spinal cord and spinal nerves, and lastly it supports your head by keeping it
in firm position.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          There are two main systems that make
up our body, the Central Nervous System (CNS) and the Peripheral Nervous System
(PNS). The CNS is composed of the brain and spine. The PNS puts the brain in
touch with the physical environment, and allows it respond accordingly. The Peripheral
nerves snake from our spinal cord of the rest of our body. The spinal cord
plays a huge factor in communicating the information from the brain to the rest
of the body.

It is part of the Axial Bones, this is essentially the
foundation of your skeletal structure and what keeps your together. Your spine
is made up of 24 bones called vertebrae. Between each bone is a disc that is
known as the intervertebral disc. The bones are further connected by small
muscles called multifidi that allow you to move your spine in conjunction with
the larger muscles of your body.

The spine is divided into five regions; the Cervical,
Thoracic, Lumbar, Sacral, and Coccygeal, the tailbone. Each region has spinal
nerves coming out the area which helps in transferring information to the rest
of the body. The Cervical spine is the neck region; this includes eight spinal
nerves. It protects the brain stem, support the skull, and allow head movements. These
nerves branch to the head, neck, shoulders, arms, and hands.

 Next is the Thoracic
vertebrae, which is the under the cervical spine and this contains twelve
spinal nerves. This is attached to the rib cage and ligaments, helps protect
vital organs and keeps them in place. These spinal nerves connect portions of
the upper abdomen and muscles in the back and chest areas.

The Lumbar spine is the third region of the spine, this
vertebra is the largest and carry most of the body’s weight. It allows more
range of motion than the thoracic spine. It enables flexion and extension
movement but actually limit our ability to rotate. The spinal nerves snake to
the lower back and legs.

The Sacrum located behind the pelvis, it fits the two hip
bone connecting the spine to the pelvis, forming a triangular shape. The spinal
nerves in this region supply to the legs, feet, genital areas of the
body. Lastly is the Coccyx, which is
also known as the tail bone, this only has one spinal nerve attaching to it.

There
is a lot going in our spinal column where millions of axons and neurotransmitters
travel up and down the spine transporting information to our brain. This
information makes our body move into different positions. There are four ways
our spine can move, flexion, hyperextension, lateral flexion and rotation. Each
region of the spine specializes in each position. For example, the Thorax
region has moderate flexion, slight hyperextension, moderate lateral flexion
and rotation. But the Lumbar region which can do all these movements can only
rotate slightly. In conclusion, the purpose
of your spine is to provide stability and keep you in an upright position which
improves your posture, enable flexibility allowing movement, protects your
spinal cord and spinal nerves, and lastly it supports your head by keeping it
in firm position.